Connect with us

Boxing & UFC

Tyson Fury, Anthony Joshua and how boxing shot itself in the foot again

Published

on

Tyson Fury, Anthony Joshua and how boxing shot itself in the foot again

Predictions and trash talk prevailed over reality after a court ruling wrecked plans for a historic British bout

Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury’s bout has collapsed
Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury’s bout has collapsed (Getty)
From a custom-built stadium in the desert to “dead in the water”, promises rarely mean so little or meet such sudden ends as in boxing. It is perhaps the sport’s greatest pitfall that the drama which dominates all big fights often prevents them from ever coming to fruition. Promoters scheme, subterfuge reigns and scores are settled without a punch being thrown. Never believe a bout is truly happening until both fighters have finished their ring walks, or else they might trip over their laces.

Tyson Fury, Anthony Joshua

The world’s governments have not often dared stand in Saudi Arabia’s path, but judge Daniel Feinstein took no heed of the lucrative persuasion. By ordering Tyson Fury to honour his binding contract and fight Deontay Wilder for a third time, a civil court ruling has scuppered the sportswashing of a nation – after all, boxing has always lived by its own set of laws. And so after months of enduring trash talk, false dawns and tired deadlines, the only truth that remains is that an all-British heavyweight bout between Anthony Joshua and Fury has, at least for now, never looked less realistic.

If it feels like a record spun a thousand times, perhaps, boxing’s best trick is to adjust without skipping a beat. Joshua is the aggrieved party in this furore, having always set out on a path to become undisputed champion, but negotiations for a defence of his WBO belt against mandatory challenger, Oleksandr Usyk, are already underway. “Tyson Fury … the world now sees you for the fraud you are,” Joshua said in a rare outburst on social media. “You’ve let boxing down. You lied to the fans and led them on. Used my name for clout not a fight. Bring me any championship fighter who can handle their business correctly.”

See also  Rafael Nadal's Belgian 'childhood Love' Blasts Media For Hyping Their Past Relationship

Fury, meanwhile, in typical fashion, has only readjusted as far as moving from one vein of profane taunts to the next. “[Wilder] had a boxing lesson the first time, humiliation,” he said. “Then you had an absolute destruction. I hate to think what he’s gonna get the next time. I’m gonna have two sets of knuckle dusters in my gloves this time, p****.”

They are two intriguing fights in their own right that offer true jeopardy. Usyk, an Olympic gold medallist, possesses tremendous speed and fleet footwork for a heavyweight, a style that will certainly test Joshua’s endurance, although questions remain over the Ukrainian’s power.

tyson fury

Recommended
‘It’s binding’: Legal expert explains Tyson Fury vs Anthony Joshua options after judge’s Deontay Wilder ruling
‘It’s binding’: Legal expert explains Tyson Fury vs Anthony Joshua options after judge’s Deontay Wilder ruling
Anthony Joshua hits out at ‘fraud’ Tyson Fury for ‘lying to fans’ with heavyweight clash under threat
Anthony Joshua hits out at ‘fraud’ Tyson Fury for ‘lying to fans’ with heavyweight clash under threat
Deontay Wilder demands $20m to allow Tyson Fury vs Anthony Joshua to go ahead
Deontay Wilder demands $20m to allow Tyson Fury vs Anthony Joshua to go ahead
Wilder has been derided and maligned since his loss to Fury in February 2020, largely due to the half-baked excuses he offered afterwards, ranging anywhere from glove-tampering to the weight of his outfit. His record is rather more honest, though, and for all the American’s crudeness, he remains the most explosive puncher in boxing. Fury’s mocking and scoffing cannot disguise that danger, having risen so spectacularly off the canvas in the twelfth round of their first bout.

See also  Donald Trump: 'Rafa Nadal is the big treasure of Spain'

It is hardly inconceivable that either Joshua or Fury fall short. That may not ruin the prospect of them facing one another, but it would certainly remove some of the gloss. It is a rare feat for two heavyweights to reign at their peaks from any country, let alone the UK, but when common sense should prevail in boxing, fate has a habit of conspiring against it. There is a reason fantasy fights have been such a popular concept in the sport since Riddick Bowe infamously dropped his WBC belt into a dustbin three decades ago as negotiations for a bout against Lennox Lewis sunk into much the same debris. As time passes and promoters become more embittered and exasperated, a historic fight to savour between Joshua and Fury feels evermore doomed to a similar path of ugly machination.

antony joshua

In the meantime, lewd soundbites will continue to breathe life into the lost August date in Saudi Arabia. Argued predictions will continue to take precedence over reality. Boxing’s circus storms on in its eternal state of irreverence, having tripped itself up again long before the laces were tied at all.

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Boxing & UFC

Tyson Fury vs Anthony Joshua Will Happen Promoter Warren Vows

Published

on

Tyson Fury
Tyson Fury vs Anthony Joshua Will Happen Promoter Warren Vows

Tyson Fury’s promoter Frank Warren has promised to ensure fans’ yearning for a unification bout with Anthony Joshua happens this year telling the BBC that “we will make it happen” in response to fans’ wishes.

All heavyweight titles now reside in Britain for the first time in history after Fury, 31, stunned Deontay Wilder, 34, on Sunday to claim the WBC title.

Tyson Fury

Joshua, whose last fight was in Saudi Arabia, holds the WBA, IBF, WBO and IBO belts.

Joshua’s promoter Eddie Hearn had earlier stated his wish to make the fight happen in the aftermath of Fury’s stunning 7th round stoppage of Wilder and reiterated his stance on Monday.

“Of course we want to see the fight,” Warren told BBC Sport. “We’ve been trying to make it for two years.”

“Hearn kept saying was it’s got to be 70/30 [the purse] in favour of AJ and so on and so fourth.

“The tables have turned now. I have no problem with 50/50. I think Tyson would deserve more but 50/50, no problem.

“This is about the boxers and more importantly the fans. If they want to see the fight we will make it happen.

“In the meantime, Eddie Hearn is acting like the guy standing outside your house with his nose pressed up against the window and keeps spouting off about Tyson.”

Tyson Fury

Joshua’s promoter Eddie Hearn speaking to Sky Sports on Monday said he would do everything possible to agree a deal, and both sides would be “clowns” and “idiots” if the fight which could be the biggest in the history of the sport failed to hold.

See also  Donald Trump: 'Rafa Nadal is the big treasure of Spain'

“Everybody is very clear on this. Everybody wants this fight — Anthony Joshua, Tyson Fury, MTK, Top Rank, Frank Warren, Matchroom,” said Hearn, referring to those involved on both sides.

“There are some hurdles to overcome on the broadcasting, but nothing too much.

“I promise you this fight will happen.”

Tyson Fury

Any prospects of a fight between the British heavyweights hinges on the fact Wilder has the option of a rematch with Fury and has 30 days to invoke a clause in his contract.

Hearn says if that happens then Joshua, 30, will face Kubrat Pulev in a mandatory IBF bout, with the promoter in talks to hold the fight at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium on 20 June.

Continue Reading

Boxing & UFC

Tyson Fury admits he was ‘wounded’ by Anthony Joshua’s loss to Oleksandr Usyk with £200m super-fight in doubt

Published

on

Tyson Fury
Tyson Fury admits he was ‘wounded’ by Anthony Joshua’s loss to Oleksandr Usyk with £200m super-fight in doubt

Tyson Fury was left “absolutely wounded” by Anthony Joshua’s defeat to Oleksandr Usyk.

Joshua relinquished his heavyweight belts following a unanimous points decision at Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, leaving the prospect of his £200million super-fight against Fury in major doubt.

Tyson Fury

Fury, who fights Deontay Wilder next week, said: “Did I watch the fight? Yes, I did. Was I absolutely wounded that he won? Yes, I was. I was hoping Joshua could win the fight but he couldn’t.”

Joshua is set for a rematch against the new champion in February or March time, with the UK the preferred location for the fight. Victory would inevitably pave the way for the Fury double header.

Two hospitalised as ‘stand collapses’ at Trooping the Colour rehearsal
But Fury said: “The only thing I’m bothered about is beating Deontay Wilder and that’s the most dangerous heavyweight out there. In my opinion, Wilder beats Joshua, Usyk, all the rest of the division, comfortable but he cannot beat me.”

Tyson Fury

Of Joshua’s chances of beating Usyk, Fury said: “My advice to Joshua in the rematch is get stuck in the best way he knows how, put his best foot forward and swing away, Jack, swing away.

“But I don’t care about anybody else – they are not on my radar only the Bronze Bomber aka the big dosser. After him, we will talk, the promoters will do their job, and I will always do mine. When I beat Wilder, I’ll be on to the next one.”

 

Continue Reading

Boxing & UFC

DID ANTHONY JOSHUA JUST ADMIT TYSON FURY IS THE BEST HEAVYWEIGHT AROUND?

Published

on

Tyson Fury
DID ANTHONY JOSHUA JUST ADMIT TYSON FURY IS THE BEST HEAVYWEIGHT AROUND?

Firstly, the current four-belt world heavyweight champion has some tale to tell about goings-on over the past eighteen months of his career.

From discussions to fight Deontay Wilder for all the top division marbles to an opponent falling out due to failed drug tests for three separate substances. To a shock defeat, a redemption victory, and a subsequent deal to face Tyson Fury – again for every strap on offer – it’s never a dull moment for the Briton.

Tyson Fury

But reflecting on his recent spell, coupled with a look back to how far he’s come, Joshua is philosophical about his future.

AJ says he’s in a position far exceeding where he thought he would be at 30 years old.

Winning the 2012 Olympics just a few years after taking up the sport, Joshua still believes he’s way ahead of the game.

On how a loss to Andy Ruiz Jr. in New York, the first of his career had affected him, Joshua surprisingly holds no regrets.

“There were certain things I was talking about perhaps two years ahead of that loss, and the defeat just showcased them,” Joshua told GQ Middle East.

“I know people say crazy things like, ‘Oh, we were planning on that loss,’ but it really was a blessing in disguise.

Tyson Fury

Andy Ruiz Anthony JoshuaEd Mulholland
“It highlighted everything I had been concerned about. After that it was simple: these are the changes I’ve been talking about, now you need to listen.”

Needing to listen was maybe advice he could have given himself before the Ruiz implosion, Joshua is quite content with how his path has panned out.

See also  Donald Trump: 'Rafa Nadal is the big treasure of Spain'

ANTHONY JOSHUA & TYSON FURY
The Londoner even says being considered alongside the likes of his rival and two-time lineal champion Fury, means he’s ahead of himself at the moment.

“I changed everything after that first fight,” says Joshua. “Losing to Andy made me rethink and restructure. I took the positives out of it, but it wasn’t easy.

“My training camp was six weeks of pure hell. I had new team members. I had injuries I was trying to overcome. There were so many different issues.

“But we got there in the end through will, determination, and intelligence.

“Being world champion, with all those knockouts, you do feel kind of unstoppable. But realistically, in boxing terms, I’m way ahead of where I should be.

Tyson Fury

“I’m working at such a quick pace. I shouldn’t even be in a position where I’m mentioned in Tyson Fury’s era. He’s five or six years ahead of me in terms of turning professional.

“In fact, when he was turning pro, I was just putting on my gloves for the first time.”

With Kubrat Pulev, a mandatory challenge from the IBF in his future, Joshua is simply waiting for the date to step up preparations.

Tyson Fury

The heavyweight clash has already been delayed from June due to the ongoing pandemic.

“I’m OK with (waiting), to be honest,” he says. “It’s saved me weeks of getting punched in the head. That can never be a bad thing.”

Continue Reading

Boxing & UFC

Tyson Fury sets out training rules after offering to coach rival Anthony Joshua

Published

on

Tyson Fury
Tyson Fury sets out training rules after offering to coach rival Anthony Joshua

Tyson Fury has told Anthony Joshua he will need to adopt his old school training methods if he is to accept his rival’s coaching offer.

Fury, who defends his WBC heavyweight title against Dillian Whyte on Saturday night, has offered to coach Joshua for his planned rematch against Oleksandr Usyk this summer. Joshua lost his belts when he was outpointed by Usyk last September

Tyson Fury

For the first time in his professional career, Joshua will change his trainer for a rematch with Usyk. ‘AJ’ has partnered with Angel Fernandez after parting ways with Rob McCracken, who received criticism for Joshua’s approach in his first bout with Usyk.

Fury has now vowed Joshua will have to ditch modern training methods if he wants to partner with him for his next bout. “I’m willing to train him, but he’s got to be willing to learn,” Fury said. “In my world, numbers on a screen on a heart rate monitor are not welcome.

Tyson Fury and Dillian Whyte weigh combined 518lb for heavyweight world title fight
undefined

Tyson Fury admits dad “hates” his boxing style ahead of Dillian Whyte showdown
undefined
Who wins tonight – Tyson Fury or Dillian Whyte? Let us know your prediction in the comments section below

“You train hard, you put your life and soul into something and you fight until the end. You don’t quit when you get knocked down, you don’t look out of the ring like you don’t want to fight on, you go and throw the kitchen sink when you’re behind in a world title fight.

See also  Cori Gauff: Emma Raducanu, Leylah Fernandez put fire in me to believe I can do same

Tyson Fury

“You don’t cruise to a points loss because in my world, getting knocked out in round one is better than losing on points and not trying to win.”

Since teaming up with coach SugarHill Steward for his rematch with Deontay Wilder in 2020, Fury’s style has drastically changed as he focuses on knockouts rather than out-boxing his opponents.

Tyson Fury said he would coach Anthony Joshua alongside SugarHill Steward
Tyson Fury said he would coach Anthony Joshua alongside SugarHill Steward ( Image: Top Rank via Getty Images)
SIMILAR ARTICLES TO THIS

Powered by
His approach for his fight with Whyte is much the same, as Fury has vowed to knockout his former training partner in what could be the final fight of his career.

Fury thinks that if Joshua could adapt a similar approach to his game, he would “definitely” be able to beat Usyk and become one of the few three-time heavyweight champions in boxing history. “I know that if I trained Joshua – me and SugarHill Steward – he’d definitely beat Oleksandr Usyk,” Fury told BT Sport.

Tyson Fury

“That’s a fact and I would be open to doing it. I’d be very open to me and SugarHill training him. I’d do it for free, because I don’t need the money. I wouldn’t take his money anyway, we would take on that challenge no problem.”

Continue Reading

Boxing & UFC

Poll: Will Tyson Fury vs Anthony Joshua actually happen in 2021?

Published

on

Tyson Fury
Poll: Will Tyson Fury vs Anthony Joshua actually happen in 2021?

We’ve heard all the talk, all the predictions for who will win when the magical fight happens, but here’s a question: will it actually happen?

Tyson Fury

Tyson Fury and Anthony Joshua have agreed to terms in principle on a two-fight deal that would start in 2021. As of now, it the fight would crown a true, bona fide, undisputed heavyweight champion, the first since Lennox Lewis beat Evander Holyfield in 1999, and the first in the era of four belts recognized as legitimate world titles.

But there’s a lot of ground to cover between now and then, too.

Fury (30-0-1, 21 KO) still has to meet Deontay Wilder in a third fight. Though Fury dominated Wilder in their February rematch, Tyson himself will tell you that he cannot take Wilder (42-1-1, 41 KO) lightly, as no matter what else anyone thinks, Deontay has dynamite in his hands and can knock anyone out if he lands the clean shot.

He may also have to deal with a potential WBC mandatory title defense against Dillian Whyte, but honestly, I’d bet against it; the WBC have been incredibly reluctant to actually give Whyte the fight he’s thought he’s been owed. But it’s not impossible, at least.

Tyson Fury

Joshua (23-1, 21 KO) has an IBF mandatory against Kubrat Pulev due, and while the IBF aren’t pushing the issue, them not setting a deadline doesn’t mean they’re going to wait forever, or that they can. Pulev would certainly look to push the issue. There’s also the WBO mandatory, which is Oleksandr Usyk, who does not intend to step aside.

See also  Donald Trump: 'Rafa Nadal is the big treasure of Spain'

While promoter Eddie Hearn is right that getting the financial details sorted is probably the biggest step of all, there’s also just the chance that whatever deal is currently agreed to will fall apart for whatever reason. It would not be the first or 500th time that has happened for a big fight.

 

Continue Reading